We're fulfilling orders through COVID-19. Get yours today! We're fulfilling orders through COVID-19. Get yours today!

Sanitization vs Disinfection What You Need To Know

Sanitization vs Disinfection What You Need To Know

There are plenty of products on the market that claim to disinfect, sanitize and clean surfaces. However, what does disinfection actually do and how is it different from sanitizing? Today we will talk about the difference between sanitizing and disinfection and how these simple cleaning tasks impact your home. 


Disinfection is defined as the thermal or chemical destruction of pathogenic and other types of microorganisms. Chemicals used in the disinfection process are called disinfectants. These products have different disinfectant properties and are not always successful at eliminating all microorganisms. Disinfectants are usually used after a cleaning product in order to add another layer of safety to the home. Although disinfectants and sanitizing agents aim to accomplish the same goals, the truth is they are different from one another.


While anyone can maintain a “clean” space, not everyone has the ability to maintain a sanitary space. Sanitization is defined as the ability to reduce or eliminate bacteria on the surface to make it sanitary. Whether or not something is sanitary is defined by public health standards. The EPA or Environmental Protection Agency actively regulates sanitizers and disinfectants to make sure they meet the pre-defined criteria. When you sanitize, you are reducing the number of bacteria present by 99.9 percent, but doing nothing about viruses and fungus. Sanitizing is better than cleaning alone as it drastically reduces pathogens on different surfaces and materials. Inadequate sanitation is a major cause of global diseases including cholder, typhoid and dysentery. With this information in mind, it’s easy to see how sanitation goes far beyond cleanliness, impacting global health and economic development issues. 


With thousands of products available, it’s hard to know if you’re making the right decisions when it comes to cleaning agents that protect against the spread of COVID-19. This also means that you should proceed with caution when it comes to products that claim to treat surfaces for days. These products work by leaving a disinfectant on hard, nonporous surfaces for hours; when the disinfectant goes inactive, a film is left behind. You have to factor in the time it takes to kill germs. When evaluating both sanitizers and disinfectants, this should be listed on a product’s label. Some chemical formulas kill respective germs in 5 minutes and others in just one minute or less.  


Keeping your family and friends safe from Covid-19 is one of your top priorities. Remember, disinfecting is a repetitive process. You might need to disinfect your home multiple times a day depending on transmission rates.The same goes for sanitization. More is always better than less.  When in doubt, just remember that a clean surface isn’t always sanitized, but a sanitized surface is always clean. Don’t just clean your home, PurLite it. 



PurLite on a Podcast

PurLite on a Podcast

Recently PurLite had the opportunity to talk to Laurie Taylor on her Podcast The Produce Moms. With over 100 podcasts under their belt, the website and podcast is aimed at mothers with a mission in encouraging the use of fresh produce. On the episode PurLite co-founders Kurt and Tim spoke in depth about the history of the company, accomplishments and future goals. 


“We think of ourselves as a light company,” Kurt said. The GM went into further detail explaining the validity of the product. PurLite is sunshine in a box. Using premium grade uv-c light bulbs, sanitization is guaranteed. There are all sorts of different ultraviolet boxes or wands out in the market now due to Covid-19. They all claim to have  gold-standard products that are effective in killing the coronavirus. However, most of these businesses only started in the beginning of this year attempting to capitalize off of the crisis. The PurLite team has been working the past few years to bring you a product that is efficient and reliable, eliminating germs with ease and sanitizes your home. 


“I can tell you as a consumer that it is best in its class, I mean I have confidence in it,” Laurie said on the podcast while discussing the product. Laurie herself has a PurLite in her home and talked at length on the podcast about all the things she sanitizes in her unit. 


When talking about the cleaning process it is important to note that cleaning alone does not kill all germs. Cleaning is designed to remove all visible dirt, soil, chemical residues and allergens from equipment, utensils and work surfaces. Whereas sanitizing is designed to reduce the number of microorganisms to a safer level. Sanitizing is usually performed after cleaning. Unclean surfaces will reduce the effectiveness of sanitizing. You can clean every day, but you should always sanitize to keep your home or workplace safe. While we are currently social distancing and self-quarantining across the country, that doesn't mean we don't need to sanitize. Many of us still leave our homes to run errands or go to work. Always remember to sanitize your hands when you return before you start touching objects in your home


“We want to make it accessible to everyone,” Tim said while talking about the movement of uv-c light from the medical field into the home. Be aware of sanitizing products you choose. Many of them contain harmful chemicals that can actually pose a health threat to your family and your pets. PurLite is different. Using our unique UV-C light bulb, PurLite sanitizes 99.9% of germs in only 30 seconds. Make no mistake, using ultraviolet light is by no means new. Ultraviolet light has been a friend to the disinfection world for over a century. UV-C light carries the most energy capable of destroying the chemical bonds that hold together the DNA and RNA of viruses and bacteria, stopping them from working. After countless hours of lab testing with some of the foremost uv-c scientists in the U.S. 

If you would like to listen to the podcast at home, check out The Produce Moms for more information. 



The Chemistry of Cleaning Supplies

The Chemistry of Cleaning Supplies

It happens to the best of us. We take simple things for granted, like how our food is made, where our garbage goes, and why our cleaning products work. Today, it’s time to get scientific. We will look into the unique chemical characteristics of different cleaning agents to learn their value in order to better protect your home from germs. 

Now, right off the bat, it is important to remember that just because something is chemical, does not necessarily mean it is an effective cleaning solution. There is an extensive list of products out there that are helpful and work beautifully without chemicals. Some chemical cleaners are costly, smell horrible, and are dangerous for the environment.

Chemical agents don’t all work the same way. Even the best formulations will not be effective if applied incorrectly or inconsistently. Most disinfectants are anti-microbial whereas some are sporicidal. This means that it kills spores which prevent the regrowth of bacteria.  

Isopropyl alcohol, in solutions between 60% and 90% alcohol, is antimicrobial against bacteria and viruses and is one of the most effective cleaners. Alcohol agents force cell proteins to clump and lose their function. Specifically, the cell membranes lose their structure and collapse, eventually dying. Alcohol cleaners should be diluted with water, as water acts as a chemical catalyst to assist in penetrating the cell wall more completely. Once it permeates the entire cell, the proteins coagulate, and therefore the microorganism dies.

Most people know it as a chemical used to treat the water in swimming pools, however, Chlorine is also a very common disinfectant used in a variety of cleaning solutions and applications. Very few chemicals are considered sporicidal; however, chlorine compounds in higher concentrations have been shown to kill bacterial spores. Chlorine works by oxidizing proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates. Hypochlorous acid, which is a weak acid that forms when chlorine is dissolved in water, has the most effect on the bacterial cell, targeting some key metabolic enzymes and destroying the organism. 

Phenol is a disinfectant and antiseptic cleaning solution found in everyday products like air fresheners, hair spray, and cosmetics. Phenol and its derivatives exhibit several types of bactericidal action. At higher concentrations, the compounds penetrate and disrupt the cell wall and make the cell proteins fall out of suspension. The next step in the damage to the bacteria is the loss in the membrane’s ability to act as a barrier to physical or chemical attack. Though phenols can act at the germination stage of bacterial spore development, this effect is reversible, making them horrible at eliminating spores. 

You may have heard about formaldehyde from its use as a sterilant in the embalming process. However, formaldehyde is also used as a surface and space decontaminate. Formaldehyde is a simple chemical compound made of hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon. All life forms including bacteria, plants, fish, animals, and humans naturally produce formaldehyde as part of cell metabolism. Formaldehyde-releasing ingredients found in everyday products, act as a preservative to kill microorganisms and prevent the growth of bacteria and other pathogens, extending product shelf life.

Having to use a different cleaner for each room and surface can be tedious. Hydrogen peroxide is unique because it is a multi-purpose cleaner that can be used on multiple surfaces. You can use it on tables, light switches, and laundry. Hydrogen peroxide is safe to clean with since it is a non-toxic substance. It won't hurt the environment, cause pollution, or create mutant animals, yet it is a strong disinfectant. The only caution that you'll need to take with hydrogen peroxide on hard surfaces is your countertops. If they are made of marble or granite, using hydrogen peroxide once in a while is okay but not for continuous use. 

The final cleaning agent we will be talking about today is iodophors or iodine solutions. An iodophor is a combination of iodine and a solubilizing agent. Iodine is the only cleaning agent that is consistently active against bacteria, spores, amoebic cysts, fungi, protozoa, yeasts, drug-resistant bacteria. 

Understanding how chemistry works in cleaning products can help you evaluate which ones are best suited to your family's needs.