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Ultraviolet light As A Sanitizer

Contrary to what some people may believe, UV light is in fact not purple. Rather, ultraviolet light is a form of electromagnetic radiation that is invisible to the human eye. It is naturally produced by and accounts for 10% of the total radiation output from our Sun. Discovered in 1801 by German physicist, Johann Ritter, the identification of the ultraviolet region of the electromagnetic spectrum gave humans a new idea of what that spectrum entailed. However, it wasn’t until nearly a century later when Ultraviolet Germicidal Irradiation or UVGI appeared in the picture as a disinfecting solution. Since then ultraviolet light has been a friend to the disinfection world.


Defined as is the use of ultraviolet (UV) energy to kill or inactivate viral, bacterial, and fungal species, UVGI was discovered by two scientists who figured out that the ability of sunlight to neutralize bacteria was dependent on three main things:

  • Intensity, 
  • Duration,
  • Individual Wavelengths

With this information becoming widely available, scientists began experimenting with different ways to utilize UV light to their benefit. In 1933 an eccentric American scientist by the name of William F. Wells developed a hypothesis elaborating on the concept of airborne infection by droplet nuclei and the use of UVGI to disinfect the air. Following initial success Wells went on to demonstrate that airborne infectious organisms could be efficiently killed in a short period of time, which helped prove the very concept that infections can be spread via the air. With the perceived success of UVGI it began to make its way into hospital rooms across the country. 


UVGI made headway in the medical field with its ability to curb infection rates and safely sanitize hospital operating rooms. UVGI is primarily delivered from three systems: portable, in-duct and upper-room. 


  • Upper-room UVGI confines the germicidal radiation to the entire room area above people's heads 
  • Portable UVGI units are used in patient, surgical and ICU rooms, and other critical-care settings
  • Stationary UVGI disinfection can take the form of either in-duct systems for airstream disinfection or upper-room installations to prevent infection transmission within a room

Today we see UVGI being used all over the world as a weapon against germs and specifically Covid-19. Coronavirus is highly susceptible to germicidal UV irradiation as it is able to inactivate microorganisms by causing DNA damage and preventing replication which can in turn deactivate the virus on surfaces. 


This is what PurLite does. Using UVC light, our PurLite box harnesses that energy in order to eliminate bacteria, fungal and viral particles that linger on the different surfaces within your home. Don’t just clean your home, PurLite it.



Germ Theory What is it?

Germ Theory What is it?

One could argue that we as a society are more cautious about germs than ever before. We wear masks, carry hand sanitizer and wash our hands frequently as an attempt to stave off the virus wreaking havoc on our world. Despite our precautions germs are so small and sneaky that they creep into our bodies without being noticed. Humans have come a long way in terms of how we treat germs. It seems impossible that people once believed that foul odors could create disease or that evil spirits could cause a person to become dangerously ill. We have also forgotten how rare it was for parents to see their children survive to adulthood. Progress in modern science has paved the way for the medical advancements we see today. Let’s take a brief glimpse into the history of modern “germ theory” and how we arrived at where we are today. 


So what is “germ theory”? Developed in the late 19th century by microbiologist Louis Pasteur, English surgeon Joseph Lister, and German physician Robert Koch, germ theory is described as a medical theory stating that certain diseases are caused by the invasion of the body by microorganisms, organisms too small to be seen except through a microscope. Prior to this finding no one knew the cause of infections or how they were spread, although there were many theories. Though these three scientists never directly worked together they were all on the same page about the source of infection. With the discovery of germs lead to development of safe surgical practices. 


Joseph Lister was the first man to develop an antiseptic technique after the discovery of germs. Antisepsis is the destruction or inhibition of microorganisms on living tissues, thereby limiting or preventing the harmful results of infection. Not everyone trusted Lister’s method at first and disregarded his work as a scam. However, as the number of surgery related infections fell, the evidence that antisepsis success became irrefutable and it was widely accepted by surgeons around the world. Wider acceptance of germ theory resulted in the emergence of the science of bacteriology, and new research revealed that antiseptics were not the only way to control infection.


The discipline of bacteriology evolved from the need of physicians to test and apply the germ theory of disease. Bacteriology is a branch of microbiology that deals with the study of bacteria.Thorough study has allowed researchers in the field to not only get a better understanding of bacteria and their characteristics,but also how to prevent and manage diseases caused by these organisms. Robert Koch, as previously mentioned, played a large role in the growth of bacteriology. His discoveries ushered in a ‘golden age’ of scientific discovery and a new era of public health. Koch developed techniques that allowed him to observe changes in bacteria over time, and he was the first person able to link specific bacteria to a disease. 


The discovery of germ theory inspired an entire generation of scientists. Though modern society in high, medium and low income countries still faces the ancient scourges of communicable diseases, but also the modern pandemics, In order to face the challenges ahead, it is important to have an understanding of the past. Although there is much in this age that is new, many of the current debates and arguments in public health are echoes of the past. We are better able to grasp the concept of germs and fight them off at home thanks to human evolution and the heroes of the past. 


 



Cleanliness and Your Mental Health

Cleanliness and Your Mental Health

There is powerful psychology behind cleaning. For some of us, even the sight of a clean and tidy home, can help blunt the effects of a stressful day. A more organized and clean house can lead to more production. You’re less stressed and more focused without distractions from clutter and dirt. Without distractions in place, your mind can process at a faster pace. It’s time to take a look at the connection between a clean house and mental health. 


Aside from having a cleaner home, the relationship between cleanliness and mental health can help us reduce anxiety and other mental health issues. This may come as a surprise but housekeeping produces endorphins which improve the ability to sleep, which in turn reduces stress. Regular participation in an aerobic exercise like scrubbing and mopping has been shown to decrease overall levels of tension, elevate and stabilize mood, improve sleep and self-esteem. Running up and down the stairs, carrying items from room to room, and scrubbing windows can burn calories, release endorphins, and help you blow off steam.  If you incorporate mindfulness into your cleaning, the work can actually be a form of meditation, leaving you more relaxed after you finish. According to Good Housekeeping 70% of Americans say tidying their home offers them a feeling of accomplishment, 61% say it makes them feel de-stressed, and 54% say they experience relaxation. A positive mental state will help you stay on top of your daily tasks. 


Few things are more satisfying than entering a perfectly clean home. Unfortunately, once your house is clean, it becomes easier to slip into bad habits. You might be tempted to leave your jacket on the floor because going to the coat rack feels like too much work. Or you might squeeze a book into an overcrowded bookshelf, because what’s one book anyway? Soon enough, your home will be just as disorganized as before. The process of wiping down your desk counter, washing your sheets, making your bed, going through clutter, taking out the trash, washing the dishes, dusting the shelves, and other hands-on cleaning-related activities can lead to a very blissful, meditative state. By thinking about what you are cleaning you might find an extra appreciation that you didn't realize you were lucky to have before. Inner peace comes more from wanting what you have than from having what you want, unearthing the wonderful haven beneath the dirt and clutter can bring a new level of gratitude for all that you have.


 Stay on top of chores and tasks in order to help yourself from getting in a rut. It’s easy to undermine the power of organizing and decluttering; however, especially while we are all confined to sheltering-in-place, remember the wide-ranging mental health benefits, and embrace your cleaning.